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Sir Donald Bradman left us 20 years ago

Michael McLaren

On the anniversary of the passing of Sir Donald Bradman 20 years ago, Michael is joined by Rina Hore, Executive Director of the Bradman Museum, to discuss the life and legacy of the man former Prime Minister John Howard in 1997 called the “greatest living Australian”.

 

Sir Donald George Bradman (27 August 1908 – 25 February 2001), nicknamed “The Don”, was widely acknowledged as the greatest batsman, if not cricketer, of all time.

The story that he practised alone with a cricket stump and a golf ball is part of Australian folklore, as is his meteoric rise from bush cricket to the Australian Test team taking just over two years.

 

Before his 22nd birthday, he had set many records for top scoring, some of which still stand, and became Australia’s sporting idol at the height of the Great Depression.

 

During a 20-year playing career, Bradman consistently scored at a level that made him, in the words of former Australia captain Bill Woodfull, “worth three batsmen to Australia” and he drew spectators in record numbers.

 

In keeping with his status as a true ‘Aussie Icon’, Bradman’s image has appeared on postage stamps and coins, and a museum dedicated to his life was opened while he was still living.

 

On the centenary of his birth, 27 August 2008, the Royal Australian Mint issued a $5 commemorative gold coin with Bradman’s image and in 2009, he was inducted posthumously into the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame.

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Michael McLaren
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