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Why it’s still too early to think about vaccinating children against COVID-19

Scott Emerson
Article image for Why it’s still too early to think about vaccinating children against COVID-19

Australians younger than 16 may be able to receive a COVID-19 as new trials and research continues overseas.

At the moment, neither the Pfizer or AstraZeneca vaccines are approved in children under 16 in Australia.

In Queensland, a 12-year-old boy has today tested positive to COVID-19, after completing a 14-day hotel quarantine stint in NSW.

Infectious diseases physician Dr Paul Griffin said it was critical to focus on vaccinating adults first, but it’s on the cards for younger Australians.

“I think it’s honestly going to be gradual, at the moment we are so far behind with our adult population that it’s a bit too early to start thinking about the children, we certainly need every adult who can and wants to have a vaccine first,” he told Scott Emerson.

“We definitely do need to look at the children too and I suspect we will gradually creep down in terms of age when get though those cohorts of adults first hopefully by the end of the year that does mean some children if they wish to, will have the opportunity to get vaccinated.”

Press PLAY below to hear his thoughts on the latest cases

Image: Getty

Scott Emerson
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