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Veterans’ Affairs Minister ‘satisfied’ whistleblowers protected in royal commission

Article image for Veterans’ Affairs Minister ‘satisfied’ whistleblowers protected in royal commission

Prime Minister Scott Morrison officially launched a royal commission into veteran and defence personnel suicide yesterday. 

The royal commission will examine systemic issues and common themes related to defence and veteran suicides.

An interim report is due on August 11 next year, before a final report is handed down on June 15, 2023.

The investigation will rely on defence personnel and veterans coming forward to come forward to make submissions.

Veterans’ Affairs Minister Andrew Gee assured Spencer Howson he’s “satisfied those protections are there” for whistleblowers.

“The commissioner has full discretion to take evidence confidentially and identities can be protected.

“That’s provided for very well, I think, in the terms of reference – I’ve been through them with a fine-tooth comb.”

Mr Gee said it’s imperative stories of wrongdoing are heard.

“The cold, hard truth is that we ask so much of these young men and women that we send out into harms way.

“But the reality is that if you look back through our history, we haven’t always given them our best in return.”

Press PLAY below to hear the full interview 

Image: Getty

Spencer Howson
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