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Indigenous boxer posthumously awarded belt, seven decades on

Ray Hadley
Article image for Indigenous boxer posthumously awarded belt, seven decades on

An Indigenous boxer has been posthumously awarded a replica belt in recognition of a middleweight title he held until his untimely death.

26-year-old David Sands died in a tractor accident on August 11, 1952, cutting what could have been a legendary boxing career short.

Sands had held the British Empire middleweight title from 1949 but never received a belt representing the achievement.

More than seven decades later, his family has been presented a replica of the belt he should have held in recognition of his accomplishments.

Member for Oxley, Melinda Pavey, helped champion the belt’s recreation and was at its presentation to the family at NSW Parliament House.

She told Ray Hadley Sands was undoubtedly “the best in the world” at his time.

“He didn’t get to go up against ‘Sugar’ Ray Robinson and other big fighters at the time because they were too scared of this Australian boy.”

But Ms Pavey said more should be done to recognise one of Australia’s best fighters.

Press PLAY below to hear more on the plans for a memorial

Image: Facebook/Melinda Pavey

Ray Hadley
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