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Die-hard U2 fans need to camp out overnight if they want to get near the stage

Natalie Peters and Erin Molan
Article image for Die-hard U2 fans need to camp out overnight if they want to get near the stage

2GB and 4BC host Clinton Maynard has been queuing for tonight’s U2 performance since 11am, and still didn’t manage to snag one of the coveted early-entry wristbands.

The first 500 fans in line for the Friday night show at the Sydney Cricket Ground were given wristbands at 8am, which allow concertgoers to come and go throughout the day without losing their spot in the queue.

Up to 50,000 people are expected to attend the Sydney performances of the Joshua Tree Tour, which has already dazzled crowds in Brisbane, Melbourne, and Adelaide. It’s been nine years since U2 last toured in Australia.

For hopefuls attending tomorrow night’s show, Clinton emailed his advice to Ray Hadley:

All [wristbands] were gone shortly after 8am, mostly going to the people who slept out overnight.

So for tomorrow if listeners are going they’ll need to get here very early.

I’m here in the queue now, came straight from work, only about 20 people here… I will sit in this spot all day in an attempt to get near the stage.

I’ll get here much earlier tomorrow, clearly I’m a 43 year old grown man with a few issues.

Despite there being a few other fans ahead of him, “I reckon I can outsprint them,” he tells Steve Price.

He hasn’t escaped his fair share of mockery from his colleagues for spending a whole day in a queue, however.

“I think Clinton needs some sort of an intervention,” Rita Panahi says.

“This isn’t acceptable behaviour!”

Click PLAY below to hear the full interview

 

Image: Getty/Marc Grimwade

Natalie Peters and Erin Molan
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