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‘Deeply offensive and complete rubbish’: Mark Levy outraged by criticism of police

Mark Levy has hit back at the outpouring of criticism leveled at police, including that of the Police Commissioner.

A junior constable in the NSW Police Force has been placed on restricted duties while a review into his conduct is carried out, following his controversial arrest of an Indigenous teenager who allegedly threatened him.

Video footage showed the officer kicking the 17-year-old Aboriginal boy’s legs out from underneath him in order to restrain him.

The teenager’s sister said the officer’s actions were “out of line” and reflected a deep divide between the police and the Aboriginal community.

Mark Levy denied the young woman’s claim, calling it “utter garbage”.

He recounted to listeners one of his own experiences while living in Waterloo, wherein Indigenous Elders and police worked together to bring home invaders to justice.

“For people to suggest this is just another attack on a young Aboriginal male is deeply offensive, and in my view, complete rubbish.”

Mark condemned the response of NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller, who apologised for the incident this morning on Ben Fordham Live, accusing the Commissioner of “rubbing his officers the wrong way”.

“Given the rubbish directed at police on a daily and hourly basis, why is he questioning the actions of one of his rank-and-file officers?

“The anger at stations across the state is palpable!

“You’ll never hear me question the actions of a serving police officer, because they deal with lowlifes and scumbags on a daily basis.”

Click PLAY below to hear Mark’s comments in full

Labor’s shadow minister for Indigenous Australians Linda Burney told Mark Levy she won’t defend either party, but is glad an investigation has been launched.

“My reaction was that it was pretty rough treatment, [though] I understand the points that you are making.

“Teenagers are lippy.

“The adult in the room, and the professionally trained person, needs to understand that they can either react to that, or see it for what it is.”

Ms Burney said the Black Lives Matter movement in the US is an opportunity for Australia to address similar issues of systemic racism.

“In this country, there are issues that we all should be dealing with … so that we really do have a good look at the way in which we are incarcerating young people.”

Click PLAY below to hear the full interview

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