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Honda’s HR-V has new found drive-ability and nimbleness

Driving Honda’s four-model compact HR-V SUV today – updated in June, all models gaining autonomous emergency braking and new variable gear ratio steering.

A new sporty variant the RS gives the front-wheel-drive HR-V a sporty more engaging feel for those seeking a sharper package. All models are highly equipped – even the entry VTi gets a rear-view camera, built-in satellite navigation, a 7-inch colour touch screen, 16-inch alloys and climate control air. Power source is a 1.8-litre naturally-aspirated engine mated to a revised CVT continuously variable automatic – as I said earlier the CVT now with far less slip in this latest series. The Honda HR-V’s newdrive-ability and nimbleness is now most noticeable. The four models range from 24,990 to 34,590 but for my money the entry VTi and next model up the VTi-S are the ones that offer the best overall value for money. This small SUV sits in the most competitive segment in the new vehicle market and its very well placed. As I said earlier it has one glaring omission and it applies to many cars and SUV’s and that’s the lack of a seat height adjuster on the front passenger seat – car companies
obviously justify this on a cost basis but it puts many passengers in a much lower position to the driver – especially if you’re short wasted. Honda is enjoying a resurgence this year with sales up 16 percent driven by its latest Civic hatch, larger CR-V SUV and this much improved HR-V range. The HR-V now one of the best small SUV’s in the market. I’m David Berthon

 

 

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